The Long Blue Line: Coast Guard Cutter Bear and NOAA hunt for the Bear

Painting depicting USCGC Bear (WMEC-901) and namesake USRC Bear together in one illustration. (Coast Guard Collection)

Last summer, after several months of preparation, the Coast Guard Cutter Bear received a mission objective for 14 days of its 72-day patrol off the coast of New England. CGC Bear was tasked with serving as a research vessel, facilitating a search for the wreck of the original United States Revenue Cutter Bear.

The Long Blue Line: Joseph Toahty (Le-Tuts-Taka)- Pawnee warrior of Guadalcanal

Coast Guard enlistment photograph of Joseph R. Toahty at age 21. (National Archives)

Joseph Toahty, half Pawnee and half Kiowa Indian, joined the Coast Guard in 1941. He was the first Pawnee Indian to go to sea, the first Native American to participate in a U.S. naval offensive operation and the first to set foot in enemy territory during the World War II.

The Long Blue Line: Keeper Miles—working with a disability in the 1800s

Illustration of a man with prosthetic leg climbing a ladder. (A.A. Marks Company 1888)

Born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1845, John Miles was a keeper in the United States Lighthouse Service who continued to serve after losing his leg. After the Civil War, Miles lived in Fernandina, Florida, and served at Amelia Island’s North Range Lights located in the extreme northeast corner of Florida. There he lived and worked from 1873 into the 1880s and likely until his death in 1895.

Dear Coast Guard Family: Domestic Violence Prevention and Resources

October is National Domestic Violence Prevention Month, an observance designed to help service members, military spouses and intimate partners build safer relationships and prevent domestic abuse by increasing awareness of patterns of behaviors that are unhealthy and where to seek help and support.

The Long Blue Line: America’s first ice ships and icebreakers

Color photograph of Northland, with cut-down masts, sitting in the ice in World War II’s Greenland Patrol. (U.S. Coast Guard)

During the Age of Sail, the seasonal pattern of icebound winters froze-in merchant vessels and reduced the wintertime demand for revenue cutters on the Great Lakes, in the Northeast and in the Mid-Atlantic States. In some cases, cutters were decommissioned in December, winterized and their crews dismissed until the spring thaw.