In the Coast Guard

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GULFPORT, Miss. (Sept, 6, 2005) Coast Guard Station Gulfport Mississippi after it was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. USCG photo by Lt.j.g Earl Lingerfelt.
GULFPORT, Miss. (Sept, 6, 2005) Coast Guard Station Gulfport Mississippi after it was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. USCG photo by Lt.j.g Earl Lingerfelt.
  • Station Gulfport had a ribbon cutting as it returned to the waterfront after being completely destroyed during Hurricane Katrina.Story here

    I have been lucky enough to meet with the crew members of Station Gulfport on a number of occasions and let me tell you this little station has a whole lot of heart, a heap of courage and they really do embody Semper Paratus.

    You see it wasn’t just Hurricane Katrina that tested the determination of Station Gulfport. After Hurricane Katrina, the station was working out of trailers until their permanent building could be built. Then Hurricanes Gustav and Ike both ravaged the station, at one point putting more than 6 feet of water in the trailers they had been working out of. Station Gulfport’s crew continued to rebuild, continued to do their mission even as their temporary buildings were destroyed. Maybe most moving to me was seeing how great their morale was, how steady their determination and how proud they were to be out there doing the hard work they do every day.

  • Near Moorehead City, South Carolina yesterday, the Coast Guard and Good Samaritan rescued three people aboard a pleasure craft taking on water. Good Samaritans can be a great help in a SAR case and this case was no exception as the Good Sam was the first to arrive on scene to provide help.
    Story here

    The part that stood out to me in the story was that the Coast Guard received the mayday from the vessel in distress, which means that the 42-foot craft had some method of calling for help. See where I am going with this? It is boating season, be safe, be prepared. Have we beaten this drum enough yet?

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