In the Coast Guard- May 28, 2009

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  • Where there is a marine casualty there will probably be an investigation. A marine casualty could be something like the case involving a collision between the Mel Oliver and M/V Tintomara which resulted in an oil spill that closed the Mississippi or a case that involves the sinking of a vessel and the loss of life, such as the case of the Lady Mary.

    While the inquiry should resume shortly into the Lady Mary case, investigators say there is no evidence that a container ship that was in the area collided with the scallop boat that sank off Cape May on March 24, killing six people.

    Story here.

  • There is inherent risk in every evolution the Coast Guard conducts, as crew members from Port Security Unit 301 in Cape Cod, Mass. learned first hand when their boat capsized during training. The five crew members were pulled from the water, one suffering an ankle injury and another showing signs of hypothermia.

    Story here

    The Coast Guard will of course be looking into the case to find out what caused the boat to capsize. Small boat teams are trained to operate as safely and efficiently as possible, but when something like this happens it is important to look closely at the cause.

  • The search for the 18-year-old teen from Louisana who fell from a cruise ship earlier this week has been suspended after the Coast Guard searched approximately 5,300 square miles approximately 150 miles southwest of Tampa.

    Story here.

    Capt. Drew Pearson, the Seventh Coast Guard District’s chief of search and rescue had this to say, “After an exhaustive search effort to find Bruce O’krepki, we have made the difficult decision to suspend our active search efforts. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family and friends during this difficult time.”

    Capt. Pearson is right, it is a difficult decision any time it has to be made, and how tragic is it that this teen was celebrating graduation from high school, which is a time when all young people are looking forward to the future and he was lost at sea? The loss of a life is something that anyone working on a case feels when that case is suspended or has an otherwise tragic end. No matter how many searches you are involved in, from what I have been told, it never gets any easier.

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