itCG-men found alive, drug bust pictures, proposed ballast water rule, CG fire dept awarded

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  • Last week, the Compass talked about an extensive search for three missing fisherman in the Gulf of Mexico. Fortunately, a Good Samaritan found and rescued the three men about 180 miles off the coast of Port Aransas, Texas, yesterday. The men had spent nearly a week at sea clinging to the hull of their capsized vessel. Click here to watch a video of their homecoming.
    Story here
  • Yesterday, the itCG post talked about an Ecstasy bust off the coast of Washington. Picture of the bust are available at the Coast Guard Visual Information (CGVI) Gallery.
    Click here and search “Neah Bay”
  • Thursday, the Coast Guard proposed a rule titled, “Standards for Living Organisms in Ships’ Ballast Water Discharged in U.S. Waters.” Ships take on ballast water in various ports to keep them stable while loading and unloading cargo. However, the water is often discharged in new places and can carry microorganisms and fish that may introduce and spread nonindigenous species. The proposed rule will establish, “standards for the allowable concentration of living organisms in ships’ ballast water discharged in U.S. waters.” The proposal is published in the Federal Register and available for comment until Nov. 27.
    Story here
  • Coast Guard ISC Kodiak’s Fire Department was awarded the 2009 Coast Guard Fire Department of the Year and the Civilian Firefighter of the Year. Over the past year, the fire department responded to 586 calls, performed 406 prevention inspections, maintained 667 fire extinguishers, conducted base CPR training and much more. Read the story to find out more about the department and the Civilian Firefighter of the Year, John Glaz.
    Story here

2 comments on “itCG-men found alive, drug bust pictures, proposed ballast water rule, CG fire dept awarded”

  1. great article i agree the guard is the best.However, the water is often discharged in new places and can carry microorganisms and fish that may introduce and spread nonindigenous species

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