Maritime forces at work

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Canada’s Halifax Class patrol frigates, HMCS Toronto and HMCS Calgary recently participated in Operation Caribbe. HMCS Toronto, depicted here, operates out of her home port of Halifax, N.S. Formation Imaging Services photo by Royal Canadian Navy Cpl. Peter Reed.
Canada’s Halifax-Class patrol frigates, HMCS Toronto and HMCS Calgary recently participated in Operation Caribbe. HMCS Toronto, depicted here, operates out of her home port of Halifax, N.S. Formation Imaging Services photo by Royal Canadian Navy Cpl. Peter Reed.

Whenever a Coast Guard boatcrew conducts a drug-enforcement patrol or an aircrew flies over one of our nation’s ports to ensure its security, they are working with a global network of partners to get the mission done.

Recently, the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Navy and Canadian Maritime Forces Atlantic strengthened this global network as they discussed the mutual homeland security and defense issues of the three maritime commands charged with protecting the East Coast.

Lt. Cmdr. Deborah Lindquist, Sector Hampton Roads command center supervisor, briefs Vice Adm. David Buss, Task Force 20 commander, Rear Adm. David Gardam, Canadian Maritime Forces Atlantic commander and Vice Adm. Robert Parker, Atlantic Area commander, during a tour of the Joint Harbor Operations Center.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer Steve Carleton.
Lt. Cmdr. Deborah Lindquist, Sector Hampton Roads command center supervisor, briefs Vice Adm. David Buss, Task Force 20 commander, Rear Adm. David Gardam, Canadian Maritime Forces Atlantic commander and Vice Adm. Robert Parker, Atlantic Area commander, during a tour of the Joint Harbor Operations Center. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer Steve Carleton.

“The three-party talks are instrumental for the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and the Royal Canadian Navy to coordinate our efforts on shared maritime defense and maritime security issues,” said U.S. Navy Vice Adm. David Buss, U.S. Fleet Forces, deputy commander for Fleet and Joint Operations.

“The combined efforts allow us to identify gaps and seams in our processes and to collaboratively work together to eliminate them,” added Buss.

It is increasingly important to recognize these gaps as resources become more limited. Each service must carefully manage resources, ensuring forces remain competent in confronting the diverse challenges of operating in the maritime environment.

With both the U.S. and Canada’s mutual interests on maritime issues, the groups discussed maritime homeland security and defense, humanitarian aid and disaster relief, maritime domain awareness and a road map for future collaborative efforts.

“The three-party staff talks are a key component in our effort to strengthen relationships and enhance unity of effort between the Coast Guard, Navy and our Canadian Partners to the north,” said Atlantic Area commander, Coast Guard Vice Adm. Robert Parker. “The relationships we build now help make our coasts safer by improving layered security in the Atlantic Area of responsibility.”

U.S. Navy Vice Adm. David Buss, Task Force 20 commander, drives Coast Guard response boat. Buss, along with senior representatives from the Coast Guard and Canadian Maritime Forces Atlantic met to discuss mutual homeland security and defense issues.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer Steve Carleton.
U.S. Navy Vice Adm. David Buss, Task Force 20 commander, drives Coast Guard response boat. Buss, along with senior representatives from the Coast Guard and Canadian Maritime Forces Atlantic met to discuss mutual homeland security and defense issues. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer Steve Carleton.

It was with this layered security approach in mind that the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Navy and Royal Canadian Navy joined forces to participate in Operation Caribbe – the standing U.S.-led, multi-national counter-drug surveillance and interdiction operation in the international waters of the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific.

Together, the services conducted combined operations in international waters, including boarding, searching and interdicting.

“Op Caribbe is just one example of how security of the maritime commons has emerged as a global issue, creating opportunities to partner at sea with other nations,” said Vice Adm. Paul Maddison, Royal Canadian Navy commander.

The U.S. Coast Guard – at home and around the world – achieves amazing results with limited resources to safeguard Americans. But, as crews operate in harsh, ever-changing maritime environments, they must continue to leverage their global network of equipment, capabilities and partners to serve local communities and the nation.

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