Scientific adventures in the Arctic

Crewmembers aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy recently supported scientific research in the Arctic’s dynamic waters. As the crew supported vital scientific research, they were joined by a multitude of scientists and support staff from the National Intelligence University, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Air Force, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and University of Alaska.

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An aerial view of Coast Guard Cutter Healy in Arctic waters. Photo courtesy of NOAA.
An aerial view of Coast Guard Cutter Healy in Arctic waters. Photo courtesy of NOAA.

Crewmembers aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy recently supported scientific research in the Arctic’s dynamic waters. As the crew supported vital scientific research, they were joined by a multitude of scientists and support staff from the National Intelligence University, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Air Force, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and University of Alaska.

Dr. Peter Leitner, a professor and faculty member at the National Intelligence University, was aboard the red-hulled Healy and braved Arctic temperatures to understand the effects of extreme weather on unmanned systems. As part of his first trip aboard Healy he worked with the Coast Guard’s Research and Development Center as they investigated implications for national security.

In addition to aerial unmanned systems research, Leitner helped place and collect the Thermal Oscar on the ice. Created by the Research and Development Center, the Thermal Oscar approximates human head emissivity and buoyancy to test sensors and identify people in potentially life-threatening water conditions. It is designed to assist with emergency training in deep waters.

Leitner recently shared a photo essay at the National Intelligence University’s blog and we encourage you to check it out to learn more about the crew and scientists who are at the forefront of science and technology.

1 comments on “Scientific adventures in the Arctic”

  1. USCGC HEALY has a great crew. Hardworking and long hours in extreme weather conditions, nothing stops them from completing their missions. doing whatever it takes to make the science work. I enjoyed my time serving aboard her and look forward to when I can return.

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