Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2015: Wednesday

On Wednesday’s Week in the Life series, we feature operations from Coast Guard Sector San Francisco, firefighting training in Toledo, Ohio, line splicing in Erie, Pennsylvania, explosives detection training in Seattle, reparation of a land navigation light in Kodiak, Alaska, and the homecoming of Port Security Unit 308.

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For the past 225 years the Coast Guard has safeguarded our nation’s maritime interests, providing a 24/7 presence along America’s rivers, ports, coastline and on the high seas. But while the Coast Guard’s presence and impact is regional, national and international, our operations are often out of sight.

Until now.

From Sept. 28, 2015, through Oct. 4, 2015, we captured a week in the life of the service to highlight the missions performed by America’s Coast Guard. From standing watch or training on the water to supporting our frontline operations, over the week we will highlight the day-to-day lives of Coast Guard men and women throughout the country and overseas.

Follow along on Facebook and Instagram , as well as right here on the Compass Blog throughout the week.

Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua Richey, a food service specialist at Coast Guard Sector San Francisco, prepares rolls for the noon meal at the sector's galley Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015. Coast Guard FSs work long hours ensuring Coast Guar personnel are fed nutritious and filling meals. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena)
Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua Richey, a food service specialist at Coast Guard Sector San Francisco, prepares rolls for the noon meal at the sector’s galley Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015. Coast Guard FSs work long hours ensuring Coast Guar personnel are fed nutritious and filling meals. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Barry Bena.
Crew members of Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay, homeported in Cleveland, take on an inferno at the United States Maritime Administration firefighting school in Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 30, 2015. The intense training helps the crew be better prepared in case of an actual fire. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Warrant Officer Freemont Hinkle/released)
Crew members of Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay, homeported in Cleveland, take on an inferno at the United States Maritime Administration firefighting school in Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 30, 2015. The intense training helps the crew be better prepared in case of an actual fire. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Chief Warrant Officer Freemont Hinkle/released.
Petty Officer 2nd Class Brock Taylor, a member of Coast Guard Station Erie, Pa., splices double-braided nylon line for new mooring lines at the station, Sept. 30, 2015. The double-braided nylon line is manufactured for use in mooring and anchoring. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua Henry/released)
Petty Officer 2nd Class Brock Taylor, a member of Coast Guard Station Erie, Pa., splices double-braided nylon line for new mooring lines at the station, Sept. 30, 2015. The double-braided nylon line is manufactured for use in mooring and anchoring. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua Henry/released.
Petty Officer 2nd Class Elliott Felix, a maritime enforcement specialist and dog handler assigned to Maritime Safety and Security Team 91101 in Seattle, and his partner Luna, a Belgian Malinois explosives detection canine, locate an explosives detection training aid in a SeaTac International Airport terminal, Sept. 30, 2015. The training was a part of his operational transition assessment, which is first completed 30 to 45 days after the canine team has returned from their initial k9 training, followed by annual evaluations to maintain certification. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Norcross)
Petty Officer 2nd Class Elliott Felix, a maritime enforcement specialist and dog handler assigned to Maritime Safety and Security Team 91101 in Seattle, and his partner Luna, a Belgian Malinois explosives detection canine, locate an explosives detection training aid in a SeaTac International Airport terminal, Sept. 30, 2015. The training was a part of his operational transition assessment, which is first completed 30 to 45 days after the canine team has returned from their initial k9 training, followed by annual evaluations to maintain certification. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Norcross.
Petty Officer 3rd Class Bethany Scott, an electrician's mate from Aids to Navigation Team Kodiak, Alaska, repairs a VLB-44 land navigation light Sept. 30, 2015. With Alaska's vast and challenging environment, ANT Kodiak is responsible for maintaining and servicing 71 beacons in Western Alaska and the North Slope; many of which are reached by way of MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson)
Petty Officer 3rd Class Bethany Scott, an electrician’s mate from Aids to Navigation Team Kodiak, Alaska, repairs a VLB-44 land navigation light Sept. 30, 2015. With Alaska’s vast and challenging environment, ANT Kodiak is responsible for maintaining and servicing 71 beacons in Western Alaska and the North Slope; many of which are reached by way of MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson.

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