Author: mamanning1

Coast Guard removes navigation hazards from New Jersey ICW

Aids to Navigation Team Cape May crewmembers hoist channel marker wreckage onto a stern loading utility boat (BUSL) in the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway (NJICW). U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer Elijah B. Reynolds.

Coast Guardsmen from Aids to Navigation Team Cape May, N.J. and Coast Guard divers from around the country removed 22 aids to navigation, thousands of pounds of damaged steel, from the New Jersey ICW during a nine-day operation.ANT Cape May crewmembers then replaced the damaged ATON with seasonal foam buoys.

The Long Blue Line: Early African American service—first to serve and first to sacrifice

Very rare and faded photograph showing the original Pea Island Life-Saving Station crew and keeper, Richard Etheridge, on the left side. (U.S. Coast Guard)

African Americans comprise the longest serving minority in the United States Coast Guard. They were the first to serve and, in many ways, were the first to sacrifice, pioneering the way ahead for all minorities in the Coast Guard, U.S. military, and the nation.

Coast Guard co-hosts emergency management training

NEMBA students complete week one of the program (“Foundations of Emergency Management”) at the Old Dominion University Virginia Modeling, Analysis & Simulation Center in Suffolk, VA.

Members from the Coast Guard Office of Emergency Management and Disaster Response, Coast Guard 5thDistrict and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management recently collaborated to bring an exciting emergency management training opportunity to the field: a CG-VDEM pilot of the National Emergency Management Basic Academy.

Coast Guard recycles concrete buoy sinkers on artificial reef

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Oak (WLB-211) crewmembers lower a buoy sinker into the Atlantic Ocean to add to an artificial reef near Yarmouth, Massachusetts. Photo courtesy of Mark Rousseau, Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries.

The U.S. Coast Guard recycled more than 140,000 pounds of concrete buoy sinkers on an artificial reef near Yarmouth, Massachusetts. Coast Guard Cutter Oak and Aids to Navigation Team Woods Hole used the discontinued concrete sinkers to support the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries’ artificial reef program.

The Long Blue Line: “CG 1”—the Coast Guard’s first aircraft

Close-up of an OL-5 cockpit with an air-cooled machine gun mounted aft for aerial use of force and law enforcement interdiction. (U.S. Coast Guard)

In 1925, using borrowed Navy aircraft, the Coast Guard demonstrated the value of air assets through the first aerial law enforcement assist and the first aviation interdiction. The next year, Congress appropriated $162,000 to purchase the first five Coast Guard aircraft, designed specifically for the Service’s needs.

Cutter Mackinaw to mark 20th Chicago Christmas Ship anniversary

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw (WLBB-30) delivers Christmas trees from northern Michigan to Chicago every year as a part of Chicago’s Christmas Ship program. The one-of-a-kind icebreaker and its predecessor, USCGC Mackinaw (WAGB-83), have delivered more than 25,000 Christmas trees to Chicago families in the past 20 years. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Cmdr. John M. Stone.

Continuing a 20-year tradition, the Coast Guard Cutter Mackinaw will deliver 1,200 Christmas trees as part of Chicago’s Christmas Ship program. The annual tree delivery dates back more than a century when brothers August and Herman Schuenemann sold and gave away Christmas trees from the Chicago waterfront.

Legacy of Light: Tallest Georgia lighthouse marks Tybee Island

Two Coast Guard Air Station Savannah MH-65 Dolphin helicopters fly in formation in front of the Tybee Island Lighthouse. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Ryan Dickinson.

Tybee Island Light, the oldest and tallest lighthouse in Georgia, guides mariners into the Savannah River and welcomes visitors to this resort destination. The barrier island beacon is not only a popular tourist attraction but also an active Aid to Navigation that lights the way for mariners into the Port of Savannah.