Author: mamanning1

The Long Blue Line: Keeper Miles—working with a disability in the 1800s

Illustration of a man with prosthetic leg climbing a ladder. (A.A. Marks Company 1888)

Born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1845, John Miles was a keeper in the United States Lighthouse Service who continued to serve after losing his leg. After the Civil War, Miles lived in Fernandina, Florida, and served at Amelia Island’s North Range Lights located in the extreme northeast corner of Florida. There he lived and worked from 1873 into the 1880s and likely until his death in 1895.

The Long Blue Line: America’s first ice ships and icebreakers

Color photograph of Northland, with cut-down masts, sitting in the ice in World War II’s Greenland Patrol. (U.S. Coast Guard)

During the Age of Sail, the seasonal pattern of icebound winters froze-in merchant vessels and reduced the wintertime demand for revenue cutters on the Great Lakes, in the Northeast and in the Mid-Atlantic States. In some cases, cutters were decommissioned in December, winterized and their crews dismissed until the spring thaw.

HRDD: Petty Officer 2nd Class Luis Ortiz

Petty Officer 2nd Class Luis Ortiz is interviewed after being selected as the recipient of the Coast Guard’s 2019 National Image Meritorious Service Award.

Ortiz reflects the Coast Guard’s commitment with the boating communities making sure to stimulate awareness between local boaters on the area. His devotion to duty sets the example for other members of his unit and sets a standard to look for in other units.

The Long Blue Line: Coast Guard—the “North Carolina Navy”

Photo of the new Fast Response Cutter Richard Etheridge, named for the famed North Carolina Lifesaving Station keeper. (Coast Guard photo)

The Coast Guard’s history is closely tied to the State of North Carolina. This connection dates back to 1790 and the men and women who have served at the many stations and bases along the coast and eastern side of North Carolina.

The Long Blue Line: DC3 Bruckenthal’s “Brick”

Work began in February. The brick was scrubbed and wire brushed and washed for preparation. A coat of off-white primer was applied and let dry and a second coat applied. The stenciling happened over several nights in between underway duty and watches. We worked and listened to music and drank coffee late into the night to finish our labor of love and respect. We thought we had until the end of our deployment to finish the brick.