Category: History

The Long Blue Line: Master Chief McShan—leader, mentor, trailblazer and FRC namesake

SK1 McShan before her rating change from SK to YN. At time of the photograph, McShan was Civil Rights Counselor/Facilitator at TRACEN Petaluma. U.S. Coast Guard photo

Master Chief Angela M. McShan, a 20-year veteran of the Service, was the first African-American woman to achieve the enlisted rank of master chief and was a distinguished role model for the Coast Guard’s core values. Later this year, she will be honored as namesake of the new Fast Response Cutter Angela McShan.

The Long Blue Line: the first historian—a remembrance

Truman R. Strobridge, the first Coast Guard historian, passed away at his home in Jacksonville, Florida, July 21, 2019. Truman Strobridge’s varied career is one that few, if any, in the Federal Government can match. He is one of the reasons the long history of the U.S. Coast Guard has garnered greater attention from historians as well as the American public.

The Long Blue Line: 30th Anniversary of Exxon Valdez and Coast Guard’s Environmental Protection Mission

William H. Thiesen, Historian Coast Guard Atlantic Area Thirty years ago on Good Friday, March 24, 1989, the Exxon Valdez steamed into a reef at 12 knots opening eight of her 10 oil storage tanks to the pristine waters of Prince William Sound, Alaska. The resulting spill of 15 million gallons of crude oil became

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The Long Blue Line: Reliance—historic, revolutionary and OPC namesake

The Revenue Cutter Service purchased the first Reliance at the start of the Civil War. Since then, the service has commissioned three cutters bearing the namesake “Reliance.” Soon, the fifth cutter to bear the name Reliance as one of the Coast Guard’s newest 360-foot Offshore Patrol Cutters. Learn more about Reliance’s distinguished history in this week’s Long Blue Line blog.

The Long Blue Line: Coast Guard geography lesson – Districts Areas

Chart showing Coast Guard districts in their current configuration. (U.S. Coast Guard)

The U.S. Coast Guard’s predecessor service, U.S. Life Saving Service, headed by Sumner Kimball was divided into a unique district system to administer its network of boat stations. By 1881, the Life Saving Service had 183 stations that were organized into 12 districts. Today the Coast Guard operates with nine districts that make up the Area command structure (Atlantic and Pacific areas). Learn more about the changes in organization in this week’s Long Blue Line blog.