Category: Operations

Legacy of Light: Diamond Head Light guides mariners into Hawaii

The 64-foot-tall Diamond Head Light shines a white light that can be seen for 17 nautical miles away and a red sector light that can be seen for 14 nautical miles away. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew D. Rusich.

Diamond Head Light shines from a U.S. Coast Guard facility on an extinct volcano overlooking one of the most popular beaches in the world. The 64-foot-tall lighthouse shines a white light that can be seen for 17 nautical miles, and to mark the dangerous shoal, a red sector light that can be seen for 14 nautical miles.

The Long Blue Line: RM3 Floyd Wilvers—Coast Guard destroyer escort veteran

A collection of Coast Guard memorabilia that is displayed on a shelf in Mr. Wilvers’ home. (MST2 Jeffrey McConnell, USCG)

For most 17-year-olds, the years of graduating high school, attending college or trade school, and beginning the first steps into adulthood are a time of unbridled optimism and possibility. For Wilmington, North Carolina native Floyd Wilvers, now 92, turning age 17 meant a voyage into the unknown laced with fear, but also a sense of patriotism and duty.

The dynamic damage controlman

Petty Officer 2nd Class Stefan Toren attempts to start a portable dewatering pump aboard Philippine Navy ship BRP Andres Bonifacio (PS 17), near Puerto Princesa, Philippines, Oct. 15, 2019. Stefan and fellow damage controlmen from Coast Guard Cutter Stratton worked with the Philippine crew to repair a total of five dewatering and firefighting pumps aboard the ship. U.S. Coast Guard photo by PA1 Nate Littlejohn

Damage controlmen are experts in shipboard emergency systems and procedure. They are professional plumbers, welders, fire fighters and first responders to a host of potential shipboard crisis. DCs call upon a precision skill set and concoct crafty solutions to difficult problems and are disciplined, with the ability to think quickly and outside the box.

Coast Guard removes navigation hazards from New Jersey ICW

Aids to Navigation Team Cape May crewmembers hoist channel marker wreckage onto a stern loading utility boat (BUSL) in the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway (NJICW). U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer Elijah B. Reynolds.

Coast Guardsmen from Aids to Navigation Team Cape May, N.J. and Coast Guard divers from around the country removed 22 aids to navigation, thousands of pounds of damaged steel, from the New Jersey ICW during a nine-day operation.ANT Cape May crewmembers then replaced the damaged ATON with seasonal foam buoys.

Legacy of Light: Tallest Georgia lighthouse marks Tybee Island

Two Coast Guard Air Station Savannah MH-65 Dolphin helicopters fly in formation in front of the Tybee Island Lighthouse. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Ryan Dickinson.

Tybee Island Light, the oldest and tallest lighthouse in Georgia, guides mariners into the Savannah River and welcomes visitors to this resort destination. The barrier island beacon is not only a popular tourist attraction but also an active Aid to Navigation that lights the way for mariners into the Port of Savannah.

The Long Blue Line: Keeper Miles—working with a disability in the 1800s

Illustration of a man with prosthetic leg climbing a ladder. (A.A. Marks Company 1888)

Born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1845, John Miles was a keeper in the United States Lighthouse Service who continued to serve after losing his leg. After the Civil War, Miles lived in Fernandina, Florida, and served at Amelia Island’s North Range Lights located in the extreme northeast corner of Florida. There he lived and worked from 1873 into the 1880s and likely until his death in 1895.