Wellness Wednesday: Ring in the New Year holistically with Total Force Fitness

Total Force Fitness (TFF) is a way to promote and maintain the fitness of the U.S. Armed Forces. The TFF framework is made up of eight related domains of fitness: physical, nutritional, mental, behavioral, social, spiritual, and medical and dental. The beginning of a new year is the perfect time to start making small changes

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Dear Coast Guard Family: Ringing in the New Year with Rhyme

Once a month, Coast Guard Compass will feature “Dear Coast Guard Family,” a column for Coast Guard families by Coast Guard spouse Rachel Conley. Rachel is married to her high school sweetheart, Chief Warrant Officer James Conley, and is the mother of three children. Rachel passionately serves as a Coast Guard Ombudsman and advocate of

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The Long Blue Line: Leyte liberation—Merry Christmas from the General and the dead of LST-66

Photo of LST-66 anchored in the San Francisco Bay after her return from the war. The black and white image shows the effects of the kamikaze attack on her aft starboard side. (U.S. Coast Guard Collection)

Seventy-five years ago, on December 25, 1944, after a six-week campaign to liberate the Philippine island of Leyte, Allied forces under General Douglas Macarthur were mopping up the last vestiges of Japanese resistance. The invasion of the Philippines was one of the last major land battles of the Pacific War leading up to the surrender of Japan. By the 26th, MacArthur announced the end of organized resistance on Leyte. It was a fitting Christmas gift to the Philippine people and MacArthur’s forces would pursue the enemy back to the island nation’s capital in Manila.

The dynamic damage controlman

Petty Officer 2nd Class Stefan Toren attempts to start a portable dewatering pump aboard Philippine Navy ship BRP Andres Bonifacio (PS 17), near Puerto Princesa, Philippines, Oct. 15, 2019. Stefan and fellow damage controlmen from Coast Guard Cutter Stratton worked with the Philippine crew to repair a total of five dewatering and firefighting pumps aboard the ship. U.S. Coast Guard photo by PA1 Nate Littlejohn

Damage controlmen are experts in shipboard emergency systems and procedure. They are professional plumbers, welders, fire fighters and first responders to a host of potential shipboard crisis. DCs call upon a precision skill set and concoct crafty solutions to difficult problems and are disciplined, with the ability to think quickly and outside the box.

Coast Guard participates with university for leadership summit

Coast Guard service members Capt. Kevin Reed, commander of Sector Long Island Sound, and Lt. Cmdr. Roberto Concepcion from Coast Guard Headquarters partnered with Alcorn State University (ASU) and service members from the U.S Army, U.S Navy and U.S Marine Corps to participate in the Alcorn State University Military Leadership Summit in Alcorn, Mississippi.

Coast Guard removes navigation hazards from New Jersey ICW

Aids to Navigation Team Cape May crewmembers hoist channel marker wreckage onto a stern loading utility boat (BUSL) in the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway (NJICW). U.S. Coast Guard photo by Senior Chief Petty Officer Elijah B. Reynolds.

Coast Guardsmen from Aids to Navigation Team Cape May, N.J. and Coast Guard divers from around the country removed 22 aids to navigation, thousands of pounds of damaged steel, from the New Jersey ICW during a nine-day operation.ANT Cape May crewmembers then replaced the damaged ATON with seasonal foam buoys.

The Long Blue Line: Early African American service—first to serve and first to sacrifice

Very rare and faded photograph showing the original Pea Island Life-Saving Station crew and keeper, Richard Etheridge, on the left side. (U.S. Coast Guard)

African Americans comprise the longest serving minority in the United States Coast Guard. They were the first to serve and, in many ways, were the first to sacrifice, pioneering the way ahead for all minorities in the Coast Guard, U.S. military, and the nation.