Tag: aids to navigation team

Legacy of Light: Diamond Head Light guides mariners into Hawaii

The 64-foot-tall Diamond Head Light shines a white light that can be seen for 17 nautical miles away and a red sector light that can be seen for 14 nautical miles away. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew D. Rusich.

Diamond Head Light shines from a U.S. Coast Guard facility on an extinct volcano overlooking one of the most popular beaches in the world. The 64-foot-tall lighthouse shines a white light that can be seen for 17 nautical miles, and to mark the dangerous shoal, a red sector light that can be seen for 14 nautical miles.

Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2015: Wednesday

On Wednesday’s Week in the Life series, we feature operations from Coast Guard Sector San Francisco, firefighting training in Toledo, Ohio, line splicing in Erie, Pennsylvania, explosives detection training in Seattle, reparation of a land navigation light in Kodiak, Alaska, and the homecoming of Port Security Unit 308.

Shipmate of the Week – MK2 Michael Dalager

Singing national anthem

Maintaining navigational aids essential to the safety of Southern Californians is the crew at Aids to Navigation Team San Diego. With just five active duty members the unit is responsible for navigational aids in the San Diego area that serve as a constant vigil for safeguarding those on the water – from the sailor to the cruise ship passenger. With such a small crew, the unit relies on three reservists who are assigned there for larger operations and to assist with daily missions. With such a small team guiding mariners, each person’s contributions are hugely important. But perhaps no one does it with as much pride as Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Dalager.