Tag: aids to navigation

Legacy of Light: New Canal Lighthouse shines over energy rich waters

Like the city it proudly serves, the New Canal Lighthouse in New Orleans is a survivor. In 1893 Hurricane Cheniere Caminada hit New Orleans. The lighthouse was not only the lone structure left standing in the area after the hurricane hit, but it also sheltered more than 200 survivors. Hurricanes pummeled the lighthouse again in 1915, 1926 and 1927. Then it was hit with the double whammy of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita that temporarily knocked it out of commission in 2005.

Legacy of Light: Florida light illuminates local legends

Legacy of Light: Florida Light illuminates local legends

The Boca Grande Lighthouse is on Gasparilla Island, a barrier island that is reportedly named after Spanish pirate Captain Jose Gaspar who allegedly buried treasure there that remains undiscovered to this day. None of this deters Coast Guard Aids to Navigation Team St. Petersburg, Florida, from keeping the light shinning.

Legacy of Light: World’s largest lens shines Aloha light

From the Makapu’u Light on Oahu’s southeastern most point, the world’s largest lighthouse lens reflects a beam that can be seen from 19 nautical miles away. The light sheperds mariners through the well traveled waters around the Aloha State from freighters transporting goods to fishing vessels, dive boats and cruise ships.

Legacy of Light: Legendary lighthouse towers over Outer Banks

Since 1803, the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse has stood as a sentinel over the windswept shores of North Carolina’s Outer Banks. With its distinctive stripes and storied history, it is the tallest lighthouse in the United States and one of the best known Aids to Navigation in the world. While the National Park Service owns the lighthouse, a Coast Guard aids to navigation team continues to maintain the lamp.

Coast Guard, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers leverage technology to ensure mariner safety

The above screenshot shows the display of the virtual aid to navigation established in partnership between the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on the Mississippi River. The virtual aid is significant in that it allows mariners to see a hazard when it is not possible to place a floating aid to mark it. U.S. Coast Guard image.

Across the nation, more than 48,000 Coast Guard aids to navigation, commonly known as ATON, mark every navigable waterway, identifying navigational hazards and ensuring mariner safety. But what happens when navigational aids are knocked off course by a natural disaster like a hurricane or flood?

225 years of Service to Nation: Aids to navigation

225 Years of Service to Nation

The technology has changed over the years but not the mission: to safeguard the Nation’s waterways and the ships, craft and personnel that ply those waters, maintaining the nation’s economy by supporting, guiding and protecting the most efficient form of transport we have – our Nation’s waterborne commercial vessels.

Week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014: Wednesday

Fireman Corinne Lee and Petty Officer 3rd Class Alan Freedman get underway for a night patrol off of Block Island, R.I., Aug. 20, 2014. The crew of three (Petty Officer 3rd Class Will Holz not pictured) is responsible for standing up the temporary life saving station on the island. Taking a 45-foot response boat medium and food for a few days, the young crew is tasked with staffing the station house, cooking meals for themselves and going on search-and-rescue missions. U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Ross Ruddell.

Wednesday’s week in the life of the Coast Guard 2014 features light work on the Chesapeake Bay, keeping helicopters clean in Kodiak, Alaska, a summer station patrol near Rhode Island, making sure they’re feed at Station Cape Disappointment and getting a dewatering pump to a boat in need far way.