Tag: Arlington National Cemetery

Coast Guard Family Month: The Honor Guard’s creed; a commitment to servicemembers and their families

The Coast Guard Ceremonial Honor Guard has a unique duty to represent the Commandant, the Military District of Washington and the United States Coast Guard through ceremonial operations held before world leaders and dignitaries. But they also have the distinct honor to help ensure that families have a special moment to remember their loved ones’ service to their country. This includes providing military honors for funerals at Arlington National Cemetery. Continue to the post to read one Honor Guardsman’s thoughts on what it means to be part of such an humbling event.

Walking through Arlington: Self-guided Coast Guard tour available on app

For more than 150 years, servicemembers from every military branch have been laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery. The cemetery has a free app to help visitors locate gravesites, monuments and more. It also includes a self-guided Coast Guard tour focusing on points of interest relating to the Coast Guard, Coast Guard aviation and notable pioneers of naval aviation.

Volunteer buglers honor veterans through “Taps”

In 2000, a Marine, Tom Day, decided digital Taps was unacceptable. To address this, Tom Day created a volunteer organization called Bugles Across America. The member of this group, over 7,000 strong, sound Taps at funerals, memorial ceremonies, grave markings and veterans ceremonies across the country. In 2012, a retired Washington, D.C., Air Force trumpeter, Jari Villanueva, founded a group called Taps for Veterans to provide a similar corps of volunteers to sound live Taps during honors.

Flags Across America

salute

The sun began to rise as Coast Guard families, recruits, scouts and cadets gathered at Arlington National Cemetery. At 65 degrees with blue skies and the sun’s golden rays shining through autumn leaves, it was an iconic fall day; a day to honor the history, traditions and heritage of servicemembers past and present.

Honoring fallen Coast Guard heroes

As we observe the manners of our profession this Memorial Day, we remember and honor our nation’s Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen who died while in military service. We must never forget that freedom is not free, but is only made possible by the thousands of patriots who stood the watch and selflessly made the ultimate sacrifice to serve our nation. We owe them an eternal debt of gratitude.

Shipmate of the Week – AUX Paul Deafenbaugh

Arlington

It’s just 24 notes; not a full composition or even a song. It’s merely a bugle call. But this bugle call does more than move mountains; it moves souls.

This 24-note bugle call, known as taps, is part of military funeral honors for those who have faithfully defended our country in war and peace. In this ceremonial paying of respects, perhaps no one else in the Coast Guard best understands taps’ power than Auxliarist Paul Deafenbaugh, the bugler for the U. S. Coast Guard Ceremonial Honor Guard.

A memorial by our own to our own

The area where the Coast Guard World War I memorial, which honors the fallen crewmembers of the Cutter Seneca and Cutter Tampa, was placed is commonly referred to as Coast Guard Hill. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Timothy Tamargo

More than three million visitors arrive at Arlington National Cemetery’s hallowed grounds each year to pay their respects to American patriots. Scattered throughout the cemetery’s rolling hills, guests can also visit dozens of memorials. Sitting proudly atop a hill – sandwiched between sections 4 and 8 – is one of these memorials. It’s the Coast Guard Memorial.

Honoring our nation’s veterans

Flags Across America event

It was two days before Americans would come together to honor our nation’s veterans when a small group gathered at Arlington National Cemetery in the early morning light. The cemetery was empty when they first arrived but by the time they would leave, a sea of fluttering Coast Guard and American flags would soon interrupt the pattern of white marble headstones and green grass.

Life of a service dog: Meeting the Bruckenthals

Nathan

As a young pup I was told a lot about becoming a service dog, even though I really did not know what it all meant. I just figured I would understand someday. For now, I was busy having fun learning about all the new things in my life but my handler thought it was time for me to learn a little more about my namesake, Petty Officer 3rd Class Nathan “Nate” Bruckenthal. Since I can’t read, my handler thought it was best for me to visit Arlington National Cemetery to introduce me to Nate.