Tag: coast guard cutter seneca

The Long Blue Line: Coxswain James C. Osborn – flawed hero during World War I

Painting of the SS Wellington with Seneca in the background. This response effort is the most honored combat-related rescue in service history. (Coast Guard Collection)

He wasn’t perfect but no one can dispute he served as a hero in the U.S. Coast Guard during World War I. James Clarence Osborn served aboard Coast Guard Cutter Seneca where he risked life and limb saving his shipmates while escorting a torpedoed British steamship to the port of Brest, France. He was awarded the Navy Cross Medal and Gold Lifesaving Medal for his bravery but fell into trouble with authorities later in life. Regardless of his troubles, his heroism should not be forgotten.

The Long Blue Line: Four missions that made Coast Guard Cutter Seneca famous

Coast Guard Cutter Seneca (WMEC-906) is part of the U.S. Coast Guard’s “Famous”-Class of medium-endurance cutters. Many may wonder why the modern Seneca’s namesake became “famous” until they learn of the original Seneca’s heroic 28-year career. Destroying derelict ships, saving lives in World War I, initiating the International Ice Patrol, and capturing rumrunners during Prohibition – these missions were a part of the first Seneca’s story.

Preparing for the mission

The Coast Guard’s ability to complete missions across the globe is contingent upon capable platforms and, most importantly, Coast Guard members with the proper skills, knowledge, and experience. Prior to deployments, Coast Guard cutters and aircraft crews hone their proficiency through rigorous training programs and practice. Providing the most realistic and high fidelity training environment to practice shipboard helicopter operations, Coast Guard Cutter Venturous led a Deck Qualification Landing (DLQ) exercise, also known as a DLQ Roundup, off the coast of Miami.

Walking through Arlington: Self-guided Coast Guard tour available on app

For more than 150 years, servicemembers from every military branch have been laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery. The cemetery has a free app to help visitors locate gravesites, monuments and more. It also includes a self-guided Coast Guard tour focusing on points of interest relating to the Coast Guard, Coast Guard aviation and notable pioneers of naval aviation.

Honoring fallen Coast Guard heroes

As we observe the manners of our profession this Memorial Day, we remember and honor our nation’s Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen who died while in military service. We must never forget that freedom is not free, but is only made possible by the thousands of patriots who stood the watch and selflessly made the ultimate sacrifice to serve our nation. We owe them an eternal debt of gratitude.

Crew recognized for ‘treasure’ hunt

Drug offload

While bad guys don’t take a break for the holidays, the good guys don’t either. And remembering to thank the good guys is the best gift ever. Just before the holidays, two recognition events marked a law enforcement milestone for the Coast Guard and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Spotting drug subs from the sky

A sinking self-propelled, semi-submersible was interdicted in the Western Caribbean Sea March 30, 2012, by the crews of Coast Guard Cutter Decisive, Coast Guard Cutter Pea Island, Joint Interagency Task Force South and the Honduran Navy. The SPSS sank during the interdiction in thousands of feet of water. U.S. Coast Guard photo. Coast Guard crews

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Your Coast Guard in 2011 – Atlantic Area

From the Rocky Mountains to the Arabian Gulf; Canada to the Caribbean Sea, the men and women of the Coast Guard’s Atlantic Area have served our nation well in 2011. The past year has been a challenging one with several crisis events, a new threat emerging in the Caribbean Sea and continued demands to serve the maritime community.

Your Coast Guard in 2011 – Southeast

2011 marked a year of exceptional security operations for the men and women of the 7th Coast Guard District. In addition to stopping the first-ever drug sub found in Caribbean waters, crews operating in the 7th District went on to interdict an unprecedented three more in rapid succession. The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Seneca made the first interdiction and marked the first time the Coast Guard successfully completed an underwater drug recovery.

Second Caribbean drug sub bust

A Coast Guard Cutter Mohawk boarding team member carries a bale of cocaine interdicted from a self-propelled semi-submersible vessel in the Caribbean Sea. U.S. Coast Guard photo. Earlier this summer, Compass featured a story on Coast Guard Cutter Seneca seizing close to $180 million dollars worth of cocaine in the first Coast Guard self-propelled semi-submersible

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