Tag: motor lifeboat

Coast Guard Heroes: John F. McCormick

Boatswain John F. McCormick was Officer-in-Charge of the wooden 52-foot motor lifeboat Triumph out of Station Point Adams at the mouth of the Columbia River. On March 26, 1938, Triumph proceeded out to the bar and stood by while several crab boats crossed in. The tug Tyee with a barge load of logs in tow was attempting to cross out. Tyee passed too closely to the lifebuoy and the barge drifted into the outer break on Clatsop Spit. While attempting to assist Tyee, Triumph was carried broadside on the face of a wave with the masts completely submerged.

Braving the surf at Cape Disappointment

surf

In order to be masters of their craft, Cape Disappointment’s crews conduct training in the surf whenever possible. During the 2012 to 2013 winter season the crew conducted more than 115 hours of surf training in conditions ranging from 40 knots of wind to stinging hail. From October 2012 to March 2013, the crew documented their training and now you can see the action!

Aloha to heavy weather training

Saying Aloha to the Pacific’s heavy seas, National Motor Lifeboat School’s instructors just finished two weeks of intensive search and rescue training off the coast of Hawaii. Lifesavers from throughout the Pacific gathered at Station Honolulu for a series of unique skill enhancement evolutions.

Shipmate of the Week – BMC William Lefever

Break

Chatham is the only unit to operate the 42-foot Special Purpose Craft – Near Shore Lifeboat. The lifeboat was specifically designed for operating in shallow water, such as the conditions found on the Chatham bar where there are depths as shallow as four feet. The lifeboat is equipped with state-of-the-art wireless control systems and twin jet-drives. As a highly unique craft, the lifeboat requires a skilled operator at the helm, and no one is better at the helm than Chief Petty Officer William Lefever.

What scares you?

52-foot motor lifeboat

Because today is Halloween – a day of spooky ghost stories, haunted houses and trick or treating – we thought we would take a moment and ask Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Mantell what he feared most. Mantell is a junior surfman responsible for operating in one of the nation’s most perilous maritime environments – Cape Disappointment. Commonly known as Station Cape “D,” crewmembers respond to more than 300 calls for assistance every year. Here, in his own words, is Mantell’s response to “What scares you?”

High side right

Into the surf

Thanks to all of your votes, the best Coast Guard marching cadence has been selected! Chief Petty Officer Cory Wadley, officer in charge of Coast Guard Station Morro Bay, Calif., wrote the original cadence that was selected as the best. Wadley is one of approximately 160 surfmen in the Coast Guard and serves at one of the 19 designated surf stations in the U.S.

Ancient history

Ancient Keeper cover

Master Chief Petty Officer James Clemens was honored today with the Joshua James Ancient Keeper Award as Chief Warrant Officer Thomas Guthlein, the former Ancient Keeper, retired from the Coast Guard. The Ancient Keeper is a title presented to an active duty Coast Guard member in recognition of their longevity in command of a boat force unit and outstanding performance in boat operations.

Coast Guard Heroes: Richard Dixon

Richard Dixon

This Compass series chronicles the first 14 heroes the Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutters have been named for. These men and women, who stood the watch before us, lived extraordinary lives as they lit the way for sailors in times past, braved gunfire in times of war and rescued those in peril at sea. As Coast

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Surf Training at Station Bodega Bay

Click the image for a higher resolution photo These are some of the best shots I have seen lately of a 47-foot motor lifeboat riding in the surf. Station Bodega Bay crew took advantage of the early season swell that brought consistent 15-foot surf to the area last Saturday to conduct training in preparation to

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