Tag: Pearl Harbor

The Long Blue Line: The attack on Pearl Harbor—“a date that will live in infamy”

Early Coast Guard recruiting poster shows a Coast Guard patrol boat battling attacking Japanese aircraft. (Courtesy of the Mariners’ Museum)

After the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, the U.S. Coast Guard proved worthy of the service’s motto Semper Paratus-“Always Ready.” The service had been transferred to the U.S. Navy providing nearly 250,000 Coast Guard men and women to support the war effort and participating in several major amphibious operations including Tarawa, Saipan, Guam, Peleliu, Iwo Jima, Okinawa and Guadalcanal. The Coast Guard proved ready to perform any naval or maritime mission required to defeat the enemy in WWII.

Our service’s response to the attack on Pearl Harbor

Today, we remember the attack on Pearl Harbor that took the lives of more than 2,000 Americans on Dec. 7, 1941. The Coast Guard immediately offered helping hands and provided support as accustomed and trained to do. Today we use those same principles during times of crisis, and we remain a steady and vigilant organization on which others can depend. Here are just a few examples of how our service reacted that fateful day. These stories remind us that our past has shaped our service.

Pearl Harbor: A catalyst that forever changed Coast Guard search and rescue

Today America remembers, mourns and honors the 2,403 Americans who were lost 75 years ago during the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. While we mourn the loss of American soldiers and sailors in observance of the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor, it is important to remember the resolve of the American spirit that perseveres and preserves their memory and sacrifices. In the heat of war, Coast Guard lieutenant and aviator, Frank A. Erickson theorized history’s greatest advance in rescue technology that forever changed how we conduct search and rescue.

The Long Blue Line: The “Gold Dust Twins” and the battle of Guadalcanal (Part 2)

The Guadalcanal campaign began on Thursday, August 7, 1942, exactly eight months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. With its lush jungle cover and tropical waters, Guadalcanal was a picturesque contrast of deep green and azure blue. But for all its natural beauty, Guadalcanal was also a fearful place to fight a war. This is Part Two of the story of Coast Guardsmen fighting in the battle of Guadalcanal during WWII.

The Long Blue Line: The “Gold Dust Twins” and the battle of Guadalcanal (Part 1)

The Guadalcanal campaign began on Thursday, August 7, 1942, exactly eight months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. With its lush jungle cover and tropical waters, Guadalcanal was a picturesque contrast of deep green and azure blue. But for all its natural beauty, Guadalcanal was also a fearful place to fight a war. This is Part One of the story of Coast Guardsmen fighting in the battle of Guadalcanal during WWII.

Pearl Harbor: 5 things you didn’t know about the Coast Guard that day

Pearl Harbor

While most know that Coast Guard Cutter Taney took part in the battle of Dec. 7, 1941, with the attacks on Pearl Harbor, many don’t realize that the Coast Guard had quite a number of units and personnel who took part in the U.S. defense of Hawaii on that Sunday. Here are five more things you may not have known about the Coast Guard’s involvement at Pearl Harbor.

Remember the Taney

Signalmen 1st Class Harry Nelson and Carpenter's Mate 3rd Class Jim Kitchen salute the national ensign during a Pearl Harbor Day ceremony aboard the retired Coast Guard Cutter Taney in Baltimore, Md., Dec. 7, 2013. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley.

Each year, as veterans groups and public officials participate in events marking the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor and America’s official entry into World War II, Coast Guardsmen past and present gather to remember those lost that day and to celebrate the resilience of our nation in the form of the one U.S. warship that did survive the attack, Coast Guard Cutter Taney.

Mounted beach patrol: When the service saddled up

On patrol

Beach patrols were normally done on foot, going back as early as 1871, when the Life-Saving Service, a predecessor of the modern Coast Guard, used foot patrols to watch the coastlines for ships in distress. The service used horses to haul boats from storage sheds to the launching point to rescue crews from ships run aground. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the wartime beach patrol was put into action and the seagoing service saddled up in 1942, when horses were authorized for use to patrol U.S. beaches. Using the horses allowed the patrols to cover far more territory faster and more easily than men on foot.

Your Coast Guard in 2011 – Pacific Southwest

In addition to the 11th Coast Guard District’s record-breaking drug busts and hundreds of life-saving missions, the Coast Guard played a key role in an unusual operation mounted off the coast of Southern California in 2011 that solved a decades-old mystery.