Tag: Russell Waesche

The Long Blue Line: Waesche – the Coast Guard’s wartime leader, second founding father

A 1943 photograph showing the commandant, Vice Adm. Russell Waesche, during a tour of wartime Coast Guard forces in the field. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Adm. Russell Waesche was responsible for the expansion of the service and improved the traditional functions of the Coast Guard during his 10 years as commandant. His administration intensified Coast Guard activity in the Great Lakes and added new missions of the Coast Guard including marine safety, icebreaking, and aids-to-navigation. One could say Waesche’s tenure as Coast Guard commandant was the most productive and successful in Coast Guard history; one could say he was the second founder of the Coast Guard.

225 years of Service to Nation: Marine safety

225 Years of Service to Nation

In the U.S. Coast Guard, the responsibility to safeguard life at sea falls heavily on the shoulders of those who operate within the marine safety mission. This mission does this by striving to prevent maritime incidents through regulation and inspections of commercial vessels and by conducting thorough investigations when accidents do occur.

225 years of Service to Nation: Coast Guard lineage

225 Years of Service to Nation

The mergers have not been easy, and some argue the process is still on-going, but the functions and expertise these agencies brought with them survive intact. They have made today’s Coast Guard what it is — the world’s premiere maritime agency.

5 facts you may not know about the Coast Guard at Normandy

jawsofdeath

When the Allied Forces landed on Normandy Beach, the U.S. Coast Guard took part in the greatest amphibious operation the world had ever seen. On June 6, 1944, the Coast Guard joined the other U.S. military branches and Allied Forces in the operation code-named Overlord. As the world commemorates the 70th anniversary of D-Day, we bring you five facts you may not know about the Coast Guard at Normandy.

Coast Guard Heroes: Joseph Tezanos

Joe Tezanos

In the spring of 1942, 22-year-old Joseph Tezanos, a factory worker and Spanish immigrant, enlisted in the U.S. Coast Guard. His life would change forever. By the end of the decade, Tezanos would be a highly decorated war hero, a survivor of one of World War II’s worst accidental disasters, and one of the first Hispanic American officers in the U.S. Coast Guard. Tezanos’ story is the American dream realized.

History – LTJG Joe Tezanos

Post written by William H. Thiesen, Ph.D, Coast Guard Atlantic Area Historian Ensign Joe Tezanos (U.S. Coast Guard photo) In the spring of 1942, 22-year-old Joseph Tezanos, a factory worker and Spanish immigrant, enlisted in the U.S. Coast Guard. His life would change forever. By the end of the decade, Tezanos would be a highly

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