Tag: Search and Rescue

Coast Guard National Search and Rescue School celebrates 50th anniversary

On October 10, 1966, the Coast Guard and U.S. Air Force joined forces to open the National Search and Rescue School in Yorktown, Virginia, to provide training in oceanic, coastal and inland search planning procedures. The school, which has delivered training to 30,000 people, including more than 2,400 international students from 150 nations, recently celebrated 50 years of Service to Nation.

Remembering Katrina: Landfall

Remembering Katrina

It was 6:10 a.m., when it came ashore in southeast Louisiana, blowing 125 mph winds and dumping heavy rain. No one could predict just how devastating the strong Category 3 hurricane would be for New Orleans. And no one knew at the time, but the Coast Guard’s response to Hurricane Katrina would turn out to be one of the largest search and rescue mission in the nation’s history.

225 years of Service to Nation: Search and rescue

225 Years of Service to Nation

Those familiar with Coast Guard history know that the Service’s development has been shaped in part by the nation’s response to natural and man-made disasters. Nowhere is that lesson clearer than the history of the Service’s search and rescue, or SAR, mission.

Remote rescues

Remote Rescue

To say that the North Shore of Alaska is a remote place is an understatement. The North Shore borders the Chukchi Sea and the Beaufort Sea, two marginal seas of the Arctic Ocean. Even in the middle of July, the waters in the area are still icy with large ice flows in many areas. It is not hard to see that conducting search and rescue, one of the Coast Guard’s core missions in the area, presents unusual challenges.

OSMS and YOU: Search and Rescue Coordination

The OAR-11 officer specialty code, or OSC, is available to those officers who demonstrate satisfactory performance and proficiency in aeronautical and maritime SAR planning and response coordination. This competency is fundamental to junior officers aspiring to a Response-Ashore career.

Lessons from 30-year old disaster still saving lives today

Buffalo marine inspector

The SS Marine Electric sunk amidst a strong storm off the coast of Virginia on Feb. 12, 1983. Of the crew of 34, only three survived. In response to the sinking, the Coast Guard convened a marine board to investigate the causes surrounding the disaster. The resulting report was released 30 years ago this summer and would significantly alter the safety culture throughout the maritime community.

Appeals court upholds fine of nearly $500,000 for false distress call

Multiple surface and aviation assets from the U.S. Coast Guard, Canadian Coast Guard and local agencies search the water in Lake Erie for four people who were reported overdue, April 17, 2014. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Philip Null.

Last week the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit upheld a restitution payment of nearly $500,000 as part of the sentence handed down in United States of America v. Danik Shiv Kumar for making a false distress call that caused a massive search on Lake Erie in March 2012.

Shipmate of the Week – FN Jacob Smith

Fireman Smith

Quick reflexes and fast thinking were put to the test late on a late Friday afternoon when the Station Bodega Bay, Calif., duty crew sprinted into action at the sound of the search and rescue alarm. Fireman Jacob Smith, who been stationed at Bodega Bay for the past three years, was a crewman on the 47-foot motor lifeboat that launched when they received word of a fishing vessel that was taking on water with two people aboard.

Shipmate of the Week – BM2 Chris Ouellette

Crew

Petty Officer 2nd Class Chris Ouellette was fresh out of boot camp in July 2007 when he was assigned to Station Grays Harbor. He arrived at his first Coast Guard unit ready to learn. Fast forward to today and Ouellette has more than just learned; he has mastered. Ouellette has earned the title of Coast Guard surfman No. 473. Along with his title of surfman, he has also earned the unofficial title of “seaman to surfman” at Grays Harbor – meaning he arrived at the unit a seaman and will be leaving a surfman.