Tag: spar

The Long Blue Line: SPARs – female trailblazers of the Coast Guard

A World War II recruiting poster for SPARs, the Women’s Reserve branch of the U.S. Coast Guard. U.S. Coast Guard image.

By the end of World War II, nearly 12,000 SPARs had served in the Coast Guard. They pioneered the role of their gender in the service, the federal government and the nation as a whole. They have since helped shape the Coast Guard into a better institution for all men and women and continue to do so today.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: SPAR and Auxiliarist Dorothy Kurtz

The Coast Guard remembers and honors the memory and legacy of one of our trailblazers – Coast Guard SPAR and Auxiliarist Dorothy Kurtz. After serving her country during WWII, Kurtz decided to continue her service to her nation as a volunteer in the Coast Guard Auxiliary. She passed away Sept. 12, 2016, at the age of 93. Fair winds and following seas, shipmate.

Coast Guard charted the Northwest Passage in 1957 and continues to play a lead role in the Arctic today

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In July of 1957, the Coast Guard was tasked with establishing and charting a successful path through the Northwest Passage in response to defense concerns caused by Cold War tensions with the Soviet Union. In October, 1957, three Coast Guard cutters accomplished what no other U.S. vessels had done before — they transited through the icy seas of the Northwest Passage and circumnavigate the North American continent. Read the full story to learn more!

The TOP SECRET story of Coast Guard code breaking

From its beginning as the Revenue Cutter Service in 1790, the Coast Guard’s unique authorities and organizational culture of adaptability have allowed it to make great contributions to intelligence and to important military successes in our nation’s history.

The Long Blue Line: Olivia Hooker – Minority Trailblazer and Community Leader

1st African-American female Coast Guardsman honored

Despite experiencing hatred and racism in her youth, Dr. Olivia Hooker has dedicated her life to serving the needs of her community and her nation, living by her life philosophy, “it’s not about you or me; it’s about what we can give to this world.” Now, at the age of 101, Hooker remains an important member of the long blue line and an example of the Coast Guard’s core values of honor, respect and devotion to duty.

A national treasure

Olivia Hooker recalled her experiences as one of the first African American female members in the Coast Guard SPAR program during World War II. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

On Nov. 23, 1942, legislation approved the implementation of the United States Coast Guard Women’s Reserve. The women who joined were more commonly known as SPARs – an acronym derived from the Coast Guard’s motto, ‘Semper Paratus, Always Ready’ – and formed the foundation for women serving today. On March 9, 1945, Olivia Hooker headed to boot camp. While women had been heading enlisting for months by then, one thing was unique about Hooker – she was one of only five African American females to first enlist in the SPAR program.

OCS classes learn to honor our service by the manners of their profession

Co-written by Jennifer Gaudio, Lt. Michael Bell and Eric Alan. Officer candidates participate in a Coast Guard history course July 15, 2013, at the Coast Guard Museum located at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. The course allows officer candidates to examine artifacts relevant to the historical periods they are currently studying. U.S.

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