Tag: TLBL

The Long Blue Line: DC3 Bruckenthal’s “Brick”

Work began in February. The brick was scrubbed and wire brushed and washed for preparation. A coat of off-white primer was applied and let dry and a second coat applied. The stenciling happened over several nights in between underway duty and watches. We worked and listened to music and drank coffee late into the night to finish our labor of love and respect. We thought we had until the end of our deployment to finish the brick.

The Long Blue Line: Jack Cullen, Nazi invaders and founding of the Coast Guard Beach Patrol

William H. Thiesen, Historian, Coast Guard Atlantic Area His keen presence of mind and discerning judgment in a grave emergency undoubtedly prevented the successful culmination of hostile intrigue designed to sabotage our national war effort. Legion of Merit Medal citation, Boatswain’s Mate 2nd Class John C. Cullen, 1943 The accolades above recognize John C. Cullen,

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The Long Blue Line: Reliance—historic, revolutionary and OPC namesake

The Revenue Cutter Service purchased the first Reliance at the start of the Civil War. Since then, the service has commissioned three cutters bearing the namesake “Reliance.” Soon, the fifth cutter to bear the name Reliance as one of the Coast Guard’s newest 360-foot Offshore Patrol Cutters. Learn more about Reliance’s distinguished history in this week’s Long Blue Line blog.

The Long Blue Line: Coast Guard geography lesson – Districts Areas

Chart showing Coast Guard districts in their current configuration. (U.S. Coast Guard)

The U.S. Coast Guard’s predecessor service, U.S. Life Saving Service, headed by Sumner Kimball was divided into a unique district system to administer its network of boat stations. By 1881, the Life Saving Service had 183 stations that were organized into 12 districts. Today the Coast Guard operates with nine districts that make up the Area command structure (Atlantic and Pacific areas). Learn more about the changes in organization in this week’s Long Blue Line blog.

The Long Blue Line: Ensign Charles Duke and seizure of rum runner Greypoint

In 1925 during the height of Prohibition, Coast Guard Ensign Charles L. Duke make the most famous single-handed seizure in Coast Guard history. Duke gave no quarter to the crew of the SS Greypoint who were bound for Nassau with 1,400 50-gallon drums of alcohol worth an estimated half a million dollars.